From their position on the International Space Station, astronauts are treated to a unique view of our planet that most people will never have the chance to see.

The ISS orbits Earth at a height of around 250 miles, meaning the space station makes around 16 trips around Earth every single day.

Now, one NASA astronaut on board the ISS has snapped a stunning photo of “stars, cities spaceships and a comet”.

Astronaut Bob Behnken, who has only been on the ISS for a month, posted the beautiful photo to Twitter.

He wrote: “Night sky, just before dawn from @Space_Station. Stars, cities, spaceships, and a comet!”

While it remains unclear which cities can be seen in the photo, the comet is Comet NEOWISE, which will be visible throughout July.

NASA shares stunning photo of Comet NEOWISE alongside veins of heaven clouds

The comet will reach its closest point to Earth on July 23, at which point it will be at a distance of 103 million kilometres, according to Paul Sutherland, author of Skymania.

He explained: “The comet’s track is currently carrying it between the constellations of Auriga and Gemini, so in early July you will have to look to the north-east, a little way beneath the bright star Capella, to find it.

“During the rest of July, Comet NEOWISE will head through Lynx and into Ursa Major, passing beneath the familiar asterism of seven bright stars known as the Big Dipper, or the Plough. This will keep it low in the sky before dawn, but it will increasingly be visible earlier in the night, in a darker sky.

Comet NEOWISE over Lebanon

“By the third week of July, the comet will be on view all night long and stargazers will be able to view it before going to bed, rather than having to get out of their warm beds before dawn!”

While the comet is likely to be visible with the naked eye, binoculars could come in handy if you have them.

Mr Sutherland added: “Binoculars will be very helpful in finding it, even if the comet is just visible in the brightening twilight.”





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